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Author Topic: Another flight aborted due to 'fumes.'  (Read 39889 times)
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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2013, 12:44:04 PM » Reply with quote

Note:  This series developed a life of its own as a reflection of many similar stories.  At first, "smoke" in aircraft during flight was reported chronologically, then by ouir view of the seriousness of the reported incident.

SMAAC recently asked for a Federal report of actions taken, if any, to get to the bottom of the fumes and smore incidents and if there were a common cause. 

1. Less than 30 minutes after being alerted to a fire in the forward main cargo deck, and with the captain already incapacitated by toxic smoke and fumes, the first officer of a Boeing 747-400 freighter lost control of the aircraft and it crashed near Dubai in September 2010. According to the final report on the accident by the UAE General Civil Aviation Authority's Air Accident Investigation Sector, investigators were unable to determine conclusively how the fire began. 

An analysis of the report by the Flight Safety magazine suggests the fire was fed by a significant number of lithium batteries that had been loaded on the aircraft during a previous stop, but which had not been declared as hazardous material.

2. A United Express regional jet about to take off at Gerald R. Ford International Airport in Grand Rapids, Michigan was evacuated on the runway March 12, 2013 after smoke started to fill the cabin. The United Flight 3654, a Regional Jet CRJ-700, crew decided to discontinue the take off and stopped the aircraft on the runway.

"There were approximately 70 people on board. Those passengers were deplaned on the runway,” says airport spokesman, Bruce Schedlbauer.

Joe Law, a flight 3654 passenger says, “Most people were calm until maybe a minute into it. The smoke must have been thicker in the back. We heard some people shouting and saying ‘Go! Go! Get out! Leave your bags!’”
« Last Edit: February 05, 2014, 12:15:05 PM by Forum Manager » Logged
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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2013, 11:34:39 PM » Reply with quote

A Southwest Airlines flight from Baltimore to Las Vegas on Tuesday March19 diverted to Indianapolis International Airport (IND) after reports of an electrical odor.

Southwest Flight 441, a Boeing 737-700 with 134 people aboard, declared an emergency and landed at 8:45 PM.  When no apparent cause for the smell was discovered, the Flight continued on to Las Vegas.  No report as to how many of the passengers stuck around and rode on the same airplane based on the findings.
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« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2013, 12:50:02 PM » Reply with quote

A Sunwing Airlines flight bound for Varadero, Cuba turned around for an emergency landing at Ottawa Airport this morning (22 Mar 2013) when passengers saw 'smoke filling the plane;' passengers feared their was  came from vents, was cold fire on the plane, according to recollections from some of the passengers who deplaned .


Daryl McWilliams, Sunwing vice president of media relations. said that In freezing conditions, aircraft are de-iced with an alcohol-based fluid that prevents the build of ice on the wings and control surfaces that can affect the handling of the aircraft. It appears deicing fluid was the cause of the smoke.

Editor's note:  It is easy for the media spokesman to speculate that outside air intakes sucked deicing fluid or moisture that condensed in the still-cold cabin ventilation ducts.  The passengers did not report the smoke or vapor came from the vents ot was cold.  As far as we know, deicing fluid is not "alcohol-based" but contains glycols and various other chemicals that are not good to breathe in gases or vapors.
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« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2013, 07:44:57 PM » Reply with quote

Two flight attendants on a Condor Airlines B-757 jet passed out briefly due to a mysterious odor aboard the plane.  Condor issued a statement saying three other crew members on the flight from Hamburg to Gran Canaria indicated they felt unwell after noticing a funny smell on the aircraft,

Two crew members passed out briefly when the plane’s engines were restarted Friday after all the passengers had disembarked. A different aircraft was used to fly the passengers back to Germany.

Note: From a short UPI story.  It is not clear if 2 or 4 people fainted.  It also is not clear how an investigation will proceed.  This is the first report of fumes inundating a parked aircraft during an engine re-start.  We speculate that the passengers were deplaned for re-fueling and the engines re-started in preparation for the next leg.
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